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Teaching materials required to run the Makeright Design Course are now available. We look forward to your feedback.

A Western Sydney University public action research event in collaboration with City of Parramatta and University of the Arts London.

Monday, 5 February 2018 9:00 am – 4:00 pm AEDT at Western Sydney University City Campus

See event details here.

 

The project was led by the Design Against Crime Research Centre in partnership with the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, teaching inmates design skills as well as gaining qualifications whilst developing a range of bags.

Come and visit the exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries between 22nd September to 31st October.

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London,

1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

www.makeright.org

DACRC have been shortlisted for the N.I.C.E. (Network for Innovations in Culture and Creativity in Europe) award by the European Centre for Creative Economy (ECCE). Out of 110 submitted applications from 23 countries, the jury selected 10 outstanding projects for their uniqueness and innovative contribution towards an inclusive world. Makeright will find out in September what this means when Adam Thorpe presents the project for the team and competes for a portion of 20,000 euros prize.

Market Road Gallery is London’s first bookable open air public gallery. It offers everyone – from local residents to established artists – the chance to create an artwork.   You can also have your say, with feedback informing how the gallery is curated and what art stays longest.

Register your interest here: www.marketroadgallery.org.

We are pleased to announce that we have been awarded Best Design Initiative 2016 by Sublime Magazine.

“This award is given by Sublime Magazine to Central Saint Martins’ Design Against Crime Research Centre, for the Makeright project, a ground-breaking course that brings design education and making outside the university confines. Its positive social impact on prison inmates, and the design collection of anti-theft bags are outstanding.”

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 BY TELERI LLOYD JONESNO

“Design unlike art, doesn’t allow you to design just for yourself. You’re designing for another, it requires communication and empathy.”

Lorraine Gamman, Director of Design Against Crime

Design Against Crime takes design-thinking into Serco’s HMP Thameside prison to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process. The DAC Research Centre, based here at Central Saint Martins, has previously developed other anti-crime design measures such as proposed solutions for ATM crime and innovating new responses to the criminal and creative practices of graffiti.

Makeright is unique not because it utilises the making skills of prison inmates but because it additionally combines these skills with design. Over eight weeks, students create anti-theft bags from design to conception with user profiles and initial concepts through a series of iterations and prototyping. The overall objective of the project is to equip inmates with skills, such as ‘purposeful learning’, useful for future employment on their release and to help decrease their chance of reoffending.

Makeright is a ground-breaking design course for prison inmates. The results, a series of bags with inmate-designed anti-theft components, launches today, and the bags will be sold at the Sue Ryder shop in Camden, with all profits going towards hospice and neurological care. The bags have been made out of lorry tarpaulin donated to the Makeright course by Abel & Cole, the organic food company, overprinted with a design by Graphic Design graduate Claire Matthews.

Keith Jarvis, Serco’s lead for prison industries at HMP Thameside comments:

“Working with offenders on employment skills is not exactly revolutionary. But what is different with this course is that inmates learn design skills and knowledge that can be transferred to many aspects of their lives, not only for employment. Even before the Coates Review May 2016 recommendations, at HMP Thameside Serco has employed design graduates in our Textiles studio and pioneered a ‘graduate volunteering’ scheme with staff, students and alumni of University of the Arts London. Our Makeright learners are mentored one-to-one by UAL and other design volunteers, and this support helps inmates find ways to reduce re-offending.”

Professor Lorraine Gamman, Design Against Crime Research Centre said:

“Makeright is a Design Against Crime response to pickpockets, bag theft and street crime delivering designs by inmates who want to put something good back into Society. Our emphasis is on the design process, as well as producing anti-theft bags, because it is through rehabilitative design education that we are able to teach prisoners new entrepreneurial skills which will help them in the outside world. Makeright bags and wearable accessories assume that people are prepared to take measures to protect themselves against thieves, while helping inmates gain qualifications and deliver bags that can be sold for a charitable cause.”

Carol Davis, Sue Ryder Prison and Community Justice Manager, said:

“Our Prison and Community Justice Programme has been going since 2006 and helps rehabilitate offenders by giving them new skills that might help reduce re-offending.”

This innovative new scheme with Serco at HMP Thameside we hope will eventually help us raise vital funds while the prisoners gain qualifications and skills to help them into employment on release. The first five designs will be available to the public in November 2016.

For many years we’ve recycled our delivery boxes and packaging wherever possible, always keen to reduce waste and reuse where we can, but I never thought I’d see the day we’d find such a brilliant new use for our old van panels,” said Abel & Cole’s Sustainability & Environmental Manager Marta Salvà Cifuentes. “We are always looking for new ways to do the right thing by the environment and help to make a difference in our local community so when we heard about the project being run by the Design Against Crime Research Centre and realised we could help we were really excited.”

The below film was made by Lotje Sodderland and follows the Makeright project, its participants, and those making it happen.

 

The Design Against Crime Research Centre has been joined by other partners to launch the Makeright initiative to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process.

Read the full Design Week article (25 April 2016) here.

 

Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships‘ – a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric

28 Apr 2016

6.30pm to 8pm

LVMH Theatre (E002)

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

 

Roman Krznaric’s writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His books include: Empathy (2014), How to Find Fulfilling Work (2013) and The Wonderbox (2011). He is founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here.
www.romankrznaric.com

Book your tickets here.

Teaching materials required to run the Makeright Design Course are now available. We look forward to your feedback.

A Western Sydney University public action research event in collaboration with City of Parramatta and University of the Arts London.

Monday, 5 February 2018 9:00 am – 4:00 pm AEDT at Western Sydney University City Campus

See event details here.

 

The project was led by the Design Against Crime Research Centre in partnership with the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, teaching inmates design skills as well as gaining qualifications whilst developing a range of bags.

Come and visit the exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries between 22nd September to 31st October.

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London,

1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

www.makeright.org

DACRC have been shortlisted for the N.I.C.E. (Network for Innovations in Culture and Creativity in Europe) award by the European Centre for Creative Economy (ECCE). Out of 110 submitted applications from 23 countries, the jury selected 10 outstanding projects for their uniqueness and innovative contribution towards an inclusive world. Makeright will find out in September what this means when Adam Thorpe presents the project for the team and competes for a portion of 20,000 euros prize.

Market Road Gallery is London’s first bookable open air public gallery. It offers everyone – from local residents to established artists – the chance to create an artwork.   You can also have your say, with feedback informing how the gallery is curated and what art stays longest.

Register your interest here: www.marketroadgallery.org.

We are pleased to announce that we have been awarded Best Design Initiative 2016 by Sublime Magazine.

“This award is given by Sublime Magazine to Central Saint Martins’ Design Against Crime Research Centre, for the Makeright project, a ground-breaking course that brings design education and making outside the university confines. Its positive social impact on prison inmates, and the design collection of anti-theft bags are outstanding.”

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 BY TELERI LLOYD JONESNO

“Design unlike art, doesn’t allow you to design just for yourself. You’re designing for another, it requires communication and empathy.”

Lorraine Gamman, Director of Design Against Crime

Design Against Crime takes design-thinking into Serco’s HMP Thameside prison to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process. The DAC Research Centre, based here at Central Saint Martins, has previously developed other anti-crime design measures such as proposed solutions for ATM crime and innovating new responses to the criminal and creative practices of graffiti.

Makeright is unique not because it utilises the making skills of prison inmates but because it additionally combines these skills with design. Over eight weeks, students create anti-theft bags from design to conception with user profiles and initial concepts through a series of iterations and prototyping. The overall objective of the project is to equip inmates with skills, such as ‘purposeful learning’, useful for future employment on their release and to help decrease their chance of reoffending.

Makeright is a ground-breaking design course for prison inmates. The results, a series of bags with inmate-designed anti-theft components, launches today, and the bags will be sold at the Sue Ryder shop in Camden, with all profits going towards hospice and neurological care. The bags have been made out of lorry tarpaulin donated to the Makeright course by Abel & Cole, the organic food company, overprinted with a design by Graphic Design graduate Claire Matthews.

Keith Jarvis, Serco’s lead for prison industries at HMP Thameside comments:

“Working with offenders on employment skills is not exactly revolutionary. But what is different with this course is that inmates learn design skills and knowledge that can be transferred to many aspects of their lives, not only for employment. Even before the Coates Review May 2016 recommendations, at HMP Thameside Serco has employed design graduates in our Textiles studio and pioneered a ‘graduate volunteering’ scheme with staff, students and alumni of University of the Arts London. Our Makeright learners are mentored one-to-one by UAL and other design volunteers, and this support helps inmates find ways to reduce re-offending.”

Professor Lorraine Gamman, Design Against Crime Research Centre said:

“Makeright is a Design Against Crime response to pickpockets, bag theft and street crime delivering designs by inmates who want to put something good back into Society. Our emphasis is on the design process, as well as producing anti-theft bags, because it is through rehabilitative design education that we are able to teach prisoners new entrepreneurial skills which will help them in the outside world. Makeright bags and wearable accessories assume that people are prepared to take measures to protect themselves against thieves, while helping inmates gain qualifications and deliver bags that can be sold for a charitable cause.”

Carol Davis, Sue Ryder Prison and Community Justice Manager, said:

“Our Prison and Community Justice Programme has been going since 2006 and helps rehabilitate offenders by giving them new skills that might help reduce re-offending.”

This innovative new scheme with Serco at HMP Thameside we hope will eventually help us raise vital funds while the prisoners gain qualifications and skills to help them into employment on release. The first five designs will be available to the public in November 2016.

For many years we’ve recycled our delivery boxes and packaging wherever possible, always keen to reduce waste and reuse where we can, but I never thought I’d see the day we’d find such a brilliant new use for our old van panels,” said Abel & Cole’s Sustainability & Environmental Manager Marta Salvà Cifuentes. “We are always looking for new ways to do the right thing by the environment and help to make a difference in our local community so when we heard about the project being run by the Design Against Crime Research Centre and realised we could help we were really excited.”

The below film was made by Lotje Sodderland and follows the Makeright project, its participants, and those making it happen.

 

The Design Against Crime Research Centre has been joined by other partners to launch the Makeright initiative to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process.

Read the full Design Week article (25 April 2016) here.

 

Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships‘ – a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric

28 Apr 2016

6.30pm to 8pm

LVMH Theatre (E002)

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

 

Roman Krznaric’s writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His books include: Empathy (2014), How to Find Fulfilling Work (2013) and The Wonderbox (2011). He is founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here.
www.romankrznaric.com

Book your tickets here.

Teaching materials required to run the Makeright Design Course are now available. We look forward to your feedback.

A Western Sydney University public action research event in collaboration with City of Parramatta and University of the Arts London.

Monday, 5 February 2018 9:00 am – 4:00 pm AEDT at Western Sydney University City Campus

See event details here.

 

The project was led by the Design Against Crime Research Centre in partnership with the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, teaching inmates design skills as well as gaining qualifications whilst developing a range of bags.

Come and visit the exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries between 22nd September to 31st October.

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London,

1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

www.makeright.org

DACRC have been shortlisted for the N.I.C.E. (Network for Innovations in Culture and Creativity in Europe) award by the European Centre for Creative Economy (ECCE). Out of 110 submitted applications from 23 countries, the jury selected 10 outstanding projects for their uniqueness and innovative contribution towards an inclusive world. Makeright will find out in September what this means when Adam Thorpe presents the project for the team and competes for a portion of 20,000 euros prize.

Market Road Gallery is London’s first bookable open air public gallery. It offers everyone – from local residents to established artists – the chance to create an artwork.   You can also have your say, with feedback informing how the gallery is curated and what art stays longest.

Register your interest here: www.marketroadgallery.org.

We are pleased to announce that we have been awarded Best Design Initiative 2016 by Sublime Magazine.

“This award is given by Sublime Magazine to Central Saint Martins’ Design Against Crime Research Centre, for the Makeright project, a ground-breaking course that brings design education and making outside the university confines. Its positive social impact on prison inmates, and the design collection of anti-theft bags are outstanding.”

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 BY TELERI LLOYD JONESNO

“Design unlike art, doesn’t allow you to design just for yourself. You’re designing for another, it requires communication and empathy.”

Lorraine Gamman, Director of Design Against Crime

Design Against Crime takes design-thinking into Serco’s HMP Thameside prison to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process. The DAC Research Centre, based here at Central Saint Martins, has previously developed other anti-crime design measures such as proposed solutions for ATM crime and innovating new responses to the criminal and creative practices of graffiti.

Makeright is unique not because it utilises the making skills of prison inmates but because it additionally combines these skills with design. Over eight weeks, students create anti-theft bags from design to conception with user profiles and initial concepts through a series of iterations and prototyping. The overall objective of the project is to equip inmates with skills, such as ‘purposeful learning’, useful for future employment on their release and to help decrease their chance of reoffending.

Makeright is a ground-breaking design course for prison inmates. The results, a series of bags with inmate-designed anti-theft components, launches today, and the bags will be sold at the Sue Ryder shop in Camden, with all profits going towards hospice and neurological care. The bags have been made out of lorry tarpaulin donated to the Makeright course by Abel & Cole, the organic food company, overprinted with a design by Graphic Design graduate Claire Matthews.

Keith Jarvis, Serco’s lead for prison industries at HMP Thameside comments:

“Working with offenders on employment skills is not exactly revolutionary. But what is different with this course is that inmates learn design skills and knowledge that can be transferred to many aspects of their lives, not only for employment. Even before the Coates Review May 2016 recommendations, at HMP Thameside Serco has employed design graduates in our Textiles studio and pioneered a ‘graduate volunteering’ scheme with staff, students and alumni of University of the Arts London. Our Makeright learners are mentored one-to-one by UAL and other design volunteers, and this support helps inmates find ways to reduce re-offending.”

Professor Lorraine Gamman, Design Against Crime Research Centre said:

“Makeright is a Design Against Crime response to pickpockets, bag theft and street crime delivering designs by inmates who want to put something good back into Society. Our emphasis is on the design process, as well as producing anti-theft bags, because it is through rehabilitative design education that we are able to teach prisoners new entrepreneurial skills which will help them in the outside world. Makeright bags and wearable accessories assume that people are prepared to take measures to protect themselves against thieves, while helping inmates gain qualifications and deliver bags that can be sold for a charitable cause.”

Carol Davis, Sue Ryder Prison and Community Justice Manager, said:

“Our Prison and Community Justice Programme has been going since 2006 and helps rehabilitate offenders by giving them new skills that might help reduce re-offending.”

This innovative new scheme with Serco at HMP Thameside we hope will eventually help us raise vital funds while the prisoners gain qualifications and skills to help them into employment on release. The first five designs will be available to the public in November 2016.

For many years we’ve recycled our delivery boxes and packaging wherever possible, always keen to reduce waste and reuse where we can, but I never thought I’d see the day we’d find such a brilliant new use for our old van panels,” said Abel & Cole’s Sustainability & Environmental Manager Marta Salvà Cifuentes. “We are always looking for new ways to do the right thing by the environment and help to make a difference in our local community so when we heard about the project being run by the Design Against Crime Research Centre and realised we could help we were really excited.”

The below film was made by Lotje Sodderland and follows the Makeright project, its participants, and those making it happen.

 

The Design Against Crime Research Centre has been joined by other partners to launch the Makeright initiative to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process.

Read the full Design Week article (25 April 2016) here.

 

Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships‘ – a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric

28 Apr 2016

6.30pm to 8pm

LVMH Theatre (E002)

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

 

Roman Krznaric’s writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His books include: Empathy (2014), How to Find Fulfilling Work (2013) and The Wonderbox (2011). He is founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here.
www.romankrznaric.com

Book your tickets here.

1. Think (Design Thinking)

The team is always on the look out for crime problems that are appropriate to address with a design response (similarly to a thief on the look out for an opportunity to steal). In being sensitised to design opportunities and empathetic to user needs, talking to multiple stakeholders, even when we are not working directly on a project, we try to use methods linked to our ‘design thinking’ to help structure our enquiry, focus our questions and responses, and to identify issues we want to work on, and areas we’d like to know more about – areas we’d like to ‘scope’.

2. Scope

‘Scoping’ refers to the initial stages of discovery and sense making within a research project. The way we scope a research question is often linked to our own passions and enthusiasms, and also to those of our collaborative networks, linked to our ‘open innovation’ model of research. Our initial methods include much ‘primary research’ often linked to anecdotal and oral accounts from stakeholders and dutyholders. There are many people we talk to manufacturers, providers, consumers. Before beginning a project we map out all the likely voices that need to be heard. Victims of crime as well as abusers will be among those we consult. Also crime prevention design advisors Architectecural Liaison officers who work for the police, or local counci staff, are often are very useful people to talk to, or special interest groups. Scoping can be one of the most inspired and creative stages of the open innovation process as it requires directors of research to piece together the information to hand to identify significant issues and knowledge gaps linked to societal trends and phenomena, and inform the most appropriate research direction. The information that feeds this process includes the consultation described above – but may also take the form of ethnographic methods and immersion technqiues.. We also enage with scholarship (desk based research/literature review) and crime science research. Scoping is often the longest stage of the project and usually begins without any funding in place. It involves the team in developing ideas, identifying knowledge gaps and research questions that may lead us to apply for external funding to undertake the research projects we want to do, usually from independent external research funding councils. Often in order to survive this period, practice-led designers and researchers may take on consultancy jobs that are linked to some of the questions we want to explore, so as to broaden our knowledge and experience of the problem. Alternatively, we might run a short CSM student project to brainstorm an area and prototype ideas, creating an ideas pool. The student help us figure out how to approach the problems we set and in the process rapidly prototyping responses to some of our hunches, and identifying what knowledge is most significant to designers and helping to identify those design research direction(s) that might be of greatest value to pursue. This helps us refine our thinking, it creates useful educational experiences for the students that we support with briefings derived from our own scoping research, external speakers and other studio feedback. It enables us to get more focused about the emphasis we have taken to design the questions and problems and reflect upon whether our responses are appropriate. Perhaps the best way forward is through practice. Practice quickly makes it evident whether elementary models like the crime triangle are of use. If not, we have alternative models for addressing more complex and subtle crime issues, in the form of Paul Ekblom’s frameworks.

3. Research

Research may be initiated during the scoping stage i.e. knowledge about user and abuser issues, and also with reference to generic crime science principles brought into the project from the beginning. But formal research usually only starts once the project is confirmed, and funding is in place. Design researchers, crime scientists and other researchers gather information from diverse sources. The designers are often interdisciplinary in approach, although the individual researchers in the team might not be, rather they are part of a multi-disciplinary team. We all undertake research and at staged meetings, set up before the project starts, we pool information. This may be linked to problem specific content or could be more widely connected to generative (rather than analytical) creative / realisation techniques. The project managers are important here, and so is their design experience. They start to pare down the most relevant sources of information to be used and perhaps visualised, also to link together facts and identify gaps in knowledge – sense making, starting to understand the systems to be addressed by design and imagine strategies for doing so.

4. Observe

Ethnographic observations, ‘people watching’, delivers user information that informs the DAC process and is often undertaken by the whole research team linked to generating (as close as possible to) first hand understandings of user and abuser issues. Also the whole context of the criminal design problem – the system to be addressed by design. Later within DACRC’s iterative design process the designers also undertake their own additional observations. The project managers start to pare down the most relevant sources of information to be used linked to staged meetings and discussions with stakeholders and dutyholders. To deliver observation effectively we often visualise our research. To allow the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches of our teams to synthesise around clear themes we literally draw out and discuss our findings – a show and tell focused on the issues under discussion. For example, we will visualise perpetrator techniques, our observations from ‘people watching’, we visualise user and provider accounts; and other forms of information linked to crime mapping etc. It is also at this stage where we start to involve stakeholders and experts in the review of the design and crime issues and receive their feedback on our research. The individual designers too may also introduce new forms of visualisation into the account. The project managers are responsible for paring down the most relevant sources of visual information to be considered and refined. The whole process is iterative. For example, even at the stage of visualisation, we iterate many times to get images right, and to get thinking right in response to stakeholder input. This makes it possible for individual team members to contribute, and helps us orchestrate what Charlie Leadbeater has described as ‘we think’ approach.

5. Co-create Design Brief

The creation of a design brief follows a similar iterative process. The designers who engage with the brief may also help redefine the brief to their own remits and context of intervention. There are many iterations of the design brief by the whole research team, but it is the way the design project managers, who are ultimately responsible for the finalisation of all the numerous iterations of the brief, synthesise the brief, predominantly linked to their design experience (what Malcolm Gladwell calls the invisible 10,000 may lead to success ). This process should be understood as about more than requirements capture because, design thinking is included, and designed in to provoke flair and imagination from other designers who may respond to such briefs. In fact, we iterate what the brief should be, as many times as project funding time lines and resources allow.

6. Critique

We engage in formal critique stages with team members, multiple stakeholders and experts, to ensure the designs, design resources or other outputs are ‘fit for purpose’. All our thinking is linked to the entire life cycle of the product from production to use and re-use or disposal. It’s here we think about how best to realise the prototypes.

7. Realise Prototypes

We finalise decisions about how best to realise the prototypes. Targeting outputs to the needs and requirements of stakeholders and dutyholders we draw upon Open innovation methods, as well as traditional market led approaches to realise prototypes for testing of our ideas. Prototypes are often realised with industry partners involved as stakeholders in the research process. These partners may be funded or may chose to get involved in exchange for first-mover advantages in relation to the commercial outputs of the research.

8. Implement & Test

We undertake small batch production of successful prototypes. These outputs are strategically implemented in order to allow us to test them, and to incorporate user (and abuser) feedback into the testing process and the final design decisions and possible iterations to follow. Final implementation occurs once we are satisfied that address to both user and abuser issues has been achieved by the tested outputs.

9. Evaluate

Many different methods of evaluation are available to assess whether or not the design is effective in delivering the outcomes sought – whether the design has worked. We engage in both qualitative and quantitative evaluation; including evaluation of outputs from the perspective of design (ease and enjoyment of use), market (cost and appeal to targeted users) and crime science (impact of outputs on impact and incidence of crime, which may be measured in a quantitative way that centres on measurable outcomes such as behavioural change or crime rates). The depth of our approach is perhaps more often encountered in what is traditionally called ‘service design’ i.e. the activity of planning and organising people, infrastructure, communication and material components of a service in order to improve its quality, the interaction between [object or] service provider and customers and the customer’s experience. Richard Buchanan’s account of service design is a helpful reference here to fully contextualise this point for those who would like a more in depth explanation.

Teaching materials required to run the Makeright Design Course are now available. We look forward to your feedback.

A Western Sydney University public action research event in collaboration with City of Parramatta and University of the Arts London.

Monday, 5 February 2018 9:00 am – 4:00 pm AEDT at Western Sydney University City Campus

See event details here.

 

The project was led by the Design Against Crime Research Centre in partnership with the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, teaching inmates design skills as well as gaining qualifications whilst developing a range of bags.

Come and visit the exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries between 22nd September to 31st October.

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London,

1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

www.makeright.org

DACRC have been shortlisted for the N.I.C.E. (Network for Innovations in Culture and Creativity in Europe) award by the European Centre for Creative Economy (ECCE). Out of 110 submitted applications from 23 countries, the jury selected 10 outstanding projects for their uniqueness and innovative contribution towards an inclusive world. Makeright will find out in September what this means when Adam Thorpe presents the project for the team and competes for a portion of 20,000 euros prize.

Market Road Gallery is London’s first bookable open air public gallery. It offers everyone – from local residents to established artists – the chance to create an artwork.   You can also have your say, with feedback informing how the gallery is curated and what art stays longest.

Register your interest here: www.marketroadgallery.org.

We are pleased to announce that we have been awarded Best Design Initiative 2016 by Sublime Magazine.

“This award is given by Sublime Magazine to Central Saint Martins’ Design Against Crime Research Centre, for the Makeright project, a ground-breaking course that brings design education and making outside the university confines. Its positive social impact on prison inmates, and the design collection of anti-theft bags are outstanding.”

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 BY TELERI LLOYD JONESNO

“Design unlike art, doesn’t allow you to design just for yourself. You’re designing for another, it requires communication and empathy.”

Lorraine Gamman, Director of Design Against Crime

Design Against Crime takes design-thinking into Serco’s HMP Thameside prison to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process. The DAC Research Centre, based here at Central Saint Martins, has previously developed other anti-crime design measures such as proposed solutions for ATM crime and innovating new responses to the criminal and creative practices of graffiti.

Makeright is unique not because it utilises the making skills of prison inmates but because it additionally combines these skills with design. Over eight weeks, students create anti-theft bags from design to conception with user profiles and initial concepts through a series of iterations and prototyping. The overall objective of the project is to equip inmates with skills, such as ‘purposeful learning’, useful for future employment on their release and to help decrease their chance of reoffending.

Makeright is a ground-breaking design course for prison inmates. The results, a series of bags with inmate-designed anti-theft components, launches today, and the bags will be sold at the Sue Ryder shop in Camden, with all profits going towards hospice and neurological care. The bags have been made out of lorry tarpaulin donated to the Makeright course by Abel & Cole, the organic food company, overprinted with a design by Graphic Design graduate Claire Matthews.

Keith Jarvis, Serco’s lead for prison industries at HMP Thameside comments:

“Working with offenders on employment skills is not exactly revolutionary. But what is different with this course is that inmates learn design skills and knowledge that can be transferred to many aspects of their lives, not only for employment. Even before the Coates Review May 2016 recommendations, at HMP Thameside Serco has employed design graduates in our Textiles studio and pioneered a ‘graduate volunteering’ scheme with staff, students and alumni of University of the Arts London. Our Makeright learners are mentored one-to-one by UAL and other design volunteers, and this support helps inmates find ways to reduce re-offending.”

Professor Lorraine Gamman, Design Against Crime Research Centre said:

“Makeright is a Design Against Crime response to pickpockets, bag theft and street crime delivering designs by inmates who want to put something good back into Society. Our emphasis is on the design process, as well as producing anti-theft bags, because it is through rehabilitative design education that we are able to teach prisoners new entrepreneurial skills which will help them in the outside world. Makeright bags and wearable accessories assume that people are prepared to take measures to protect themselves against thieves, while helping inmates gain qualifications and deliver bags that can be sold for a charitable cause.”

Carol Davis, Sue Ryder Prison and Community Justice Manager, said:

“Our Prison and Community Justice Programme has been going since 2006 and helps rehabilitate offenders by giving them new skills that might help reduce re-offending.”

This innovative new scheme with Serco at HMP Thameside we hope will eventually help us raise vital funds while the prisoners gain qualifications and skills to help them into employment on release. The first five designs will be available to the public in November 2016.

For many years we’ve recycled our delivery boxes and packaging wherever possible, always keen to reduce waste and reuse where we can, but I never thought I’d see the day we’d find such a brilliant new use for our old van panels,” said Abel & Cole’s Sustainability & Environmental Manager Marta Salvà Cifuentes. “We are always looking for new ways to do the right thing by the environment and help to make a difference in our local community so when we heard about the project being run by the Design Against Crime Research Centre and realised we could help we were really excited.”

The below film was made by Lotje Sodderland and follows the Makeright project, its participants, and those making it happen.

 

The Design Against Crime Research Centre has been joined by other partners to launch the Makeright initiative to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process.

Read the full Design Week article (25 April 2016) here.

 

Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships‘ – a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric

28 Apr 2016

6.30pm to 8pm

LVMH Theatre (E002)

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

 

Roman Krznaric’s writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His books include: Empathy (2014), How to Find Fulfilling Work (2013) and The Wonderbox (2011). He is founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here.
www.romankrznaric.com

Book your tickets here.

Teaching materials required to run the Makeright Design Course are now available. We look forward to your feedback.

A Western Sydney University public action research event in collaboration with City of Parramatta and University of the Arts London.

Monday, 5 February 2018 9:00 am – 4:00 pm AEDT at Western Sydney University City Campus

See event details here.

 

The project was led by the Design Against Crime Research Centre in partnership with the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, teaching inmates design skills as well as gaining qualifications whilst developing a range of bags.

Come and visit the exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries between 22nd September to 31st October.

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London,

1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

www.makeright.org

DACRC have been shortlisted for the N.I.C.E. (Network for Innovations in Culture and Creativity in Europe) award by the European Centre for Creative Economy (ECCE). Out of 110 submitted applications from 23 countries, the jury selected 10 outstanding projects for their uniqueness and innovative contribution towards an inclusive world. Makeright will find out in September what this means when Adam Thorpe presents the project for the team and competes for a portion of 20,000 euros prize.

Market Road Gallery is London’s first bookable open air public gallery. It offers everyone – from local residents to established artists – the chance to create an artwork.   You can also have your say, with feedback informing how the gallery is curated and what art stays longest.

Register your interest here: www.marketroadgallery.org.

We are pleased to announce that we have been awarded Best Design Initiative 2016 by Sublime Magazine.

“This award is given by Sublime Magazine to Central Saint Martins’ Design Against Crime Research Centre, for the Makeright project, a ground-breaking course that brings design education and making outside the university confines. Its positive social impact on prison inmates, and the design collection of anti-theft bags are outstanding.”

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 BY TELERI LLOYD JONESNO

“Design unlike art, doesn’t allow you to design just for yourself. You’re designing for another, it requires communication and empathy.”

Lorraine Gamman, Director of Design Against Crime

Design Against Crime takes design-thinking into Serco’s HMP Thameside prison to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process. The DAC Research Centre, based here at Central Saint Martins, has previously developed other anti-crime design measures such as proposed solutions for ATM crime and innovating new responses to the criminal and creative practices of graffiti.

Makeright is unique not because it utilises the making skills of prison inmates but because it additionally combines these skills with design. Over eight weeks, students create anti-theft bags from design to conception with user profiles and initial concepts through a series of iterations and prototyping. The overall objective of the project is to equip inmates with skills, such as ‘purposeful learning’, useful for future employment on their release and to help decrease their chance of reoffending.

Makeright is a ground-breaking design course for prison inmates. The results, a series of bags with inmate-designed anti-theft components, launches today, and the bags will be sold at the Sue Ryder shop in Camden, with all profits going towards hospice and neurological care. The bags have been made out of lorry tarpaulin donated to the Makeright course by Abel & Cole, the organic food company, overprinted with a design by Graphic Design graduate Claire Matthews.

Keith Jarvis, Serco’s lead for prison industries at HMP Thameside comments:

“Working with offenders on employment skills is not exactly revolutionary. But what is different with this course is that inmates learn design skills and knowledge that can be transferred to many aspects of their lives, not only for employment. Even before the Coates Review May 2016 recommendations, at HMP Thameside Serco has employed design graduates in our Textiles studio and pioneered a ‘graduate volunteering’ scheme with staff, students and alumni of University of the Arts London. Our Makeright learners are mentored one-to-one by UAL and other design volunteers, and this support helps inmates find ways to reduce re-offending.”

Professor Lorraine Gamman, Design Against Crime Research Centre said:

“Makeright is a Design Against Crime response to pickpockets, bag theft and street crime delivering designs by inmates who want to put something good back into Society. Our emphasis is on the design process, as well as producing anti-theft bags, because it is through rehabilitative design education that we are able to teach prisoners new entrepreneurial skills which will help them in the outside world. Makeright bags and wearable accessories assume that people are prepared to take measures to protect themselves against thieves, while helping inmates gain qualifications and deliver bags that can be sold for a charitable cause.”

Carol Davis, Sue Ryder Prison and Community Justice Manager, said:

“Our Prison and Community Justice Programme has been going since 2006 and helps rehabilitate offenders by giving them new skills that might help reduce re-offending.”

This innovative new scheme with Serco at HMP Thameside we hope will eventually help us raise vital funds while the prisoners gain qualifications and skills to help them into employment on release. The first five designs will be available to the public in November 2016.

For many years we’ve recycled our delivery boxes and packaging wherever possible, always keen to reduce waste and reuse where we can, but I never thought I’d see the day we’d find such a brilliant new use for our old van panels,” said Abel & Cole’s Sustainability & Environmental Manager Marta Salvà Cifuentes. “We are always looking for new ways to do the right thing by the environment and help to make a difference in our local community so when we heard about the project being run by the Design Against Crime Research Centre and realised we could help we were really excited.”

The below film was made by Lotje Sodderland and follows the Makeright project, its participants, and those making it happen.

 

The Design Against Crime Research Centre has been joined by other partners to launch the Makeright initiative to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process.

Read the full Design Week article (25 April 2016) here.

 

Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships‘ – a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric

28 Apr 2016

6.30pm to 8pm

LVMH Theatre (E002)

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

 

Roman Krznaric’s writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His books include: Empathy (2014), How to Find Fulfilling Work (2013) and The Wonderbox (2011). He is founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here.
www.romankrznaric.com

Book your tickets here.

Teaching materials required to run the Makeright Design Course are now available. We look forward to your feedback.

A Western Sydney University public action research event in collaboration with City of Parramatta and University of the Arts London.

Monday, 5 February 2018 9:00 am – 4:00 pm AEDT at Western Sydney University City Campus

See event details here.

 

The project was led by the Design Against Crime Research Centre in partnership with the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, teaching inmates design skills as well as gaining qualifications whilst developing a range of bags.

Come and visit the exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries between 22nd September to 31st October.

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London,

1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

www.makeright.org

DACRC have been shortlisted for the N.I.C.E. (Network for Innovations in Culture and Creativity in Europe) award by the European Centre for Creative Economy (ECCE). Out of 110 submitted applications from 23 countries, the jury selected 10 outstanding projects for their uniqueness and innovative contribution towards an inclusive world. Makeright will find out in September what this means when Adam Thorpe presents the project for the team and competes for a portion of 20,000 euros prize.

Market Road Gallery is London’s first bookable open air public gallery. It offers everyone – from local residents to established artists – the chance to create an artwork.   You can also have your say, with feedback informing how the gallery is curated and what art stays longest.

Register your interest here: www.marketroadgallery.org.

We are pleased to announce that we have been awarded Best Design Initiative 2016 by Sublime Magazine.

“This award is given by Sublime Magazine to Central Saint Martins’ Design Against Crime Research Centre, for the Makeright project, a ground-breaking course that brings design education and making outside the university confines. Its positive social impact on prison inmates, and the design collection of anti-theft bags are outstanding.”

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 BY TELERI LLOYD JONESNO

“Design unlike art, doesn’t allow you to design just for yourself. You’re designing for another, it requires communication and empathy.”

Lorraine Gamman, Director of Design Against Crime

Design Against Crime takes design-thinking into Serco’s HMP Thameside prison to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process. The DAC Research Centre, based here at Central Saint Martins, has previously developed other anti-crime design measures such as proposed solutions for ATM crime and innovating new responses to the criminal and creative practices of graffiti.

Makeright is unique not because it utilises the making skills of prison inmates but because it additionally combines these skills with design. Over eight weeks, students create anti-theft bags from design to conception with user profiles and initial concepts through a series of iterations and prototyping. The overall objective of the project is to equip inmates with skills, such as ‘purposeful learning’, useful for future employment on their release and to help decrease their chance of reoffending.

Makeright is a ground-breaking design course for prison inmates. The results, a series of bags with inmate-designed anti-theft components, launches today, and the bags will be sold at the Sue Ryder shop in Camden, with all profits going towards hospice and neurological care. The bags have been made out of lorry tarpaulin donated to the Makeright course by Abel & Cole, the organic food company, overprinted with a design by Graphic Design graduate Claire Matthews.

Keith Jarvis, Serco’s lead for prison industries at HMP Thameside comments:

“Working with offenders on employment skills is not exactly revolutionary. But what is different with this course is that inmates learn design skills and knowledge that can be transferred to many aspects of their lives, not only for employment. Even before the Coates Review May 2016 recommendations, at HMP Thameside Serco has employed design graduates in our Textiles studio and pioneered a ‘graduate volunteering’ scheme with staff, students and alumni of University of the Arts London. Our Makeright learners are mentored one-to-one by UAL and other design volunteers, and this support helps inmates find ways to reduce re-offending.”

Professor Lorraine Gamman, Design Against Crime Research Centre said:

“Makeright is a Design Against Crime response to pickpockets, bag theft and street crime delivering designs by inmates who want to put something good back into Society. Our emphasis is on the design process, as well as producing anti-theft bags, because it is through rehabilitative design education that we are able to teach prisoners new entrepreneurial skills which will help them in the outside world. Makeright bags and wearable accessories assume that people are prepared to take measures to protect themselves against thieves, while helping inmates gain qualifications and deliver bags that can be sold for a charitable cause.”

Carol Davis, Sue Ryder Prison and Community Justice Manager, said:

“Our Prison and Community Justice Programme has been going since 2006 and helps rehabilitate offenders by giving them new skills that might help reduce re-offending.”

This innovative new scheme with Serco at HMP Thameside we hope will eventually help us raise vital funds while the prisoners gain qualifications and skills to help them into employment on release. The first five designs will be available to the public in November 2016.

For many years we’ve recycled our delivery boxes and packaging wherever possible, always keen to reduce waste and reuse where we can, but I never thought I’d see the day we’d find such a brilliant new use for our old van panels,” said Abel & Cole’s Sustainability & Environmental Manager Marta Salvà Cifuentes. “We are always looking for new ways to do the right thing by the environment and help to make a difference in our local community so when we heard about the project being run by the Design Against Crime Research Centre and realised we could help we were really excited.”

The below film was made by Lotje Sodderland and follows the Makeright project, its participants, and those making it happen.

 

The Design Against Crime Research Centre has been joined by other partners to launch the Makeright initiative to develop resilience and empathy among inmates and create a collection of anti-theft bags in the process.

Read the full Design Week article (25 April 2016) here.

 

Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships‘ – a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric

28 Apr 2016

6.30pm to 8pm

LVMH Theatre (E002)

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London

N1C 4AA

 

Roman Krznaric’s writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His books include: Empathy (2014), How to Find Fulfilling Work (2013) and The Wonderbox (2011). He is founder of the world’s first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here.
www.romankrznaric.com

Book your tickets here.